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Lucien Le Moine

Montrachet Grand Cru

Montrachet Grand Cru

No superlatives need be stated here about Montrachet. Mounir has worked in several areas of Montrachet, both on the Pernand and the Chassagne side, and has even once bottled them separately. He does not produce a Montrachet every year, only when he feels it will be worthy of the vineyard’s renown, and can stand at the pinnacle of his white wines.

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Chevalier-Montrachet Grand Cru

Chevalier-Montrachet Grand Cru

The gentleman, as Mounir calls Chevalier-Montrachet, a wine that always shows lovely definition and everything in place; classic grace.

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Batard-Montrachet Grand Cru

Batard-Montrachet Grand Cru

Bâtard-Montrachet borders Montrachet on the west, and is typically a fatter, more open and more exotic wine than Chevalier-Montrachet, with less grip and a more flowery, honeyed richness.

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Criots-Batard-Montrachet Grand Cru

Criots-Batard-Montrachet Grand Cru

The soils in Criots are a combination of marl, clay and chalk. In fact, the word “Criots” means chalk in French. The south-east facing slope lies at an altitude of around 780 feet - slighly lower than neighboring Chevalier-Montrachet and Le Montrachet, so the slopes tend to have a higher proportion of clay. Mounir describes this wine as “a bridge between the body of Bâtard and the class of Montrachet.

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Corton-Charlemagne Grand Cru

Corton-Charlemagne Grand Cru

The commune of Aloxe-Corton, has the unusual distinction of having over half its area covered in grand cru vineyards. These occupy 298 acres divided among 19 climats which take the Corton grand cru appellation for red wines; five among these, totalling 120 acres, take the Corton-Charlemagne grand cru appellation for white wines as well as the Corton grand cru appellation for red wines.

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Corton Les Grandes Lolières Grand Cru

Corton Les Grandes Lolières Grand Cru

Sometimes this cru forms part of Lucien Le Moine’s Corton Blanc, other times it is bottled separately. A cru that is not often seen, and is a red cru above all. It has an exotic spicy side to the aromas and flavors, and a broad body that maintains its precision.

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Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “Morgeot”

Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “Morgeot”

This vineyard lies on this Santenay end of the road that leads down from Chassagne to Santenay, widely considered the best area for white Chassagne. The wines here are racier and have more depth than most other white Chassagne.

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Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “La Romanée”

Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “La Romanée”

Mounir says that Chassagne-Montrachet “La Romanée” is, to make an analogy, the most “Puligny” wine from Chassagne. It has a lot of silkiness and sweetness, and low acidity compared to other Chassagnes; it is a very clean wine, with a particular crème brûlée character that gives way to sweet fruit.

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Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru "Les Embrazées"

Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Embrazées

This vineyard lies on this Santenay end of the road that leads down from Chassagne to Santenay, widely considered the best area for white Chassagne. The wines here are racier and have more depth than most other white Chassagne.

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Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “La Grande Montagne”

Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “La Grande Montagne”

This tiny vineyard is located - as the name suggests - on the steep hillside of the same name just west of Chassagne-Montrachet. La Grande Montagne itself is the most southerly of the limestone hills which make up the Côte d’Or escarpment. It is located in the heart of the band of the best Chassagne 1er Crus at the top of the slope that includes Grandes Ruchottes, la Romanée and Caillerets.

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Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “Cailleret”

Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru “Cailleret”

Chassagne-Montrachet Caillerets is defined by minerality. It is a very classy wine, with lots of dustiness. It’s the wine in Chassagne that you can’t totally pin down with an easy description, and that’s why some consider it a Grand Cru level. Minerality is the main point – little white stones, lots of limestone.

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Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru “Les Folatières”

Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru “Les Folatières”

The Folatières climat lies near the summit of this slope, above Clos de la Garenne roughly midway between Meursault and Montrachet. It is the largest of Puligny’s premiers crus and is always sweet, has a lot of ripeness, showing apricot and other similar flavors. After 18-20 months the minerality comes out in the wine.

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Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru “Champ Gain”

Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru “Champ Gain”

Champ Gains is high on the hill, and produces a wine in which a sense of dryness overshadows the sweet fruit - the sweetness that comes out is not an easy sweetness, and while you get apricot and other fruits on the palate, there is always a sense of dryness pulling them back.

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Puligny-Montrachet 1er “Champ Canet”

Puligny-Montrachet 1er “Champ Canet”

Mounir describes Champ Canet as a frustrated Puligny. It has a lot of vivacity, it is racy and salty, influenced strongly by Meursault. You can think of it almost as a Meursault Perrieres in Puligny.

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Meursault 1er Cru “Charmes”

Meursault 1er Cru “Charmes”

Charmes is larger than both Perrieres and Genevrières put together, extending all the way down to the Meursault-Puligny road. The upper part of the vineyard produces extremely compelling Meursaults, with a soft flowery character that is less racy than Perrieres and less spicy than Genevrières, but just as intense.

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Meursault 1er Cru “Genevrières”

Meursault 1er Cru “Genevrières”

Genevrières is defined by viscosity. The vineyard is mid-slope, and in the Lucien Le Moine Genevrières there is always notable acidity (even in low-acid years) and alcohol. “Mr Too Much of Everything” is how Mounir likes to describe this wine. It ferments slowly, and for some reason it always has a touch of cloudiness – something never precipitates out. It’s a wild child.

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Meursault 1er Cru Les “Gouttes d’Or”

Meursault 1er Cru Les “Gouttes d’Or”

The first Premier Cru heading south into Meursault, Gouttes d’Or is characterized by displaying a full body offset along with a firm structure.

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Meursault 1er Cru “Porusot”

Meursault 1er Cru “Porusot”

Mounir likes to call Meursault Porusot the ambassador of Meursault – it takes from everything around it, Gouttes d’Or, Genevrieres, Charmes, and other vineyards, and shows a little bit of all their characters. It is a wine that doesn’t rest, it keeps changing all the time. Sweet yet flinty, as well as phenolic, it is an intellectual’s wine. Mounir was delighted to bottle Porusot for the first time in 2009.

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Nuits-St-Georges 1er Cru “Les Terres Blanches”

Nuits-St-Georges 1er Cru “Les Terres Blanches”

Les Terres Blanches is a 2.4 acre vineyard in the steepest area of Nuits-St.-Georges, and not far from the top Nuits-St.-Georges vineyards of Les Vaucrains and Les Saint-Georges. There are few producers in this small vineyard, and this very rare Nuits-St.-George white proves intriguing for its Nuits-St.-Georges character in spite of its variety and color.

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Chablis 1er Cru “Montmains”

Chablis 1er Cru “Montmains”